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rear end over-hauling?

This is a discussion on rear end over-hauling? within the Drivetrain forums, part of the LSx Technical Help Section category; After my trans went, I upgraded to a Jasper Class 1 4L60E. The thing is, I was told that my ...

  1. #1
    Member myk02k's Avatar
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    2002 Camaro Z28 6-spd

    rear end over-hauling?

    After my trans went, I upgraded to a Jasper Class 1 4L60E. The thing is, I was told that my pinion and ring gears are leaking, and with the performance trans I'm worried it'll give the 10-bolt a good yank one day that it won't wake up from. That's the main reason I haven't hit the track yet to see what the trans will do for my #'s.

    In order to prevent axle break-down, is there any way I can over-haul the axle so it stops leaking and make it more sturdy than stock? I don't have the money for a moser 12, so I have to deal with what I have right now and pray.

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    Member keliente's Avatar
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    99 Firebird Formula

    Gears do not leak. Seals do.

    They were probably talking about the pinion seal (front). Please refer to the two stickys at the top concerning how long a 10 bolt will last and more 10 bolt information.

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    Member myk02k's Avatar
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    I know they don't last long...thats what everybody says, and all I hear. I'm not looking for explainations of the problems, but answers in how to prevent the 10-bolt from taking the dump.

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    Member keliente's Avatar
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    99 Firebird Formula

    When will my 10 bolt break?

    Unfortunately, there is no 'set' horsepower where the 10 bolt will give out. It can break on stock power, at 350hp, 400hp, even 500hp+ for some lucky ones.

    Because you cannot gauge exactly when it will break, it is important to think ahead a little bit, and take some steps to preserving your 10 bolt if a 12 bolt is not in your immediate plans.

    Track hints:

    1. If you are going to be drag racing frequently and plan on running very sticky drag radials, you might want to think about getting to know someone who has a truck & trailer, just in case.

    2. If you have an automatic car, you have a better chance of a longer-lasting rear end, due to less shock in the drivetrain. This does not mean it will never break - it'll just last longer.

    3. Cars that come equipped with Torsen (mechanical) differentials tend to have more problems than Auburn (clutched) differentials. You can see which differential you have at your next rear-end fluid changing interval. If you have a torsen rear end, you will see gears inside of the differential, and there will be a steel block pushing your axles out. If you have an Auburn differential, you will see bright yellow springs inside of it.

    3a. The torsens seem to wear out quicker whether you race or not. Tell-tale signs of a fading torsen are ratcheting/clunking noises when turning/low speeds/etc. If your torsen does break, you can replace it with another, or pick up an aftermarket carrier.

    Preserving your 10-bolt:

    1. Eliminate wheel hop. Suspension is very important - what good is a lot of power if you cannot channel it to the ground effectively? Wheel hop breaks rear ends. To minimize wheel hop consider stiffening your suspension. Aftermarket lower control arms, relocation brackets, panhard bars, even torque arms will help plant your rear to the ground.

    2. Maintain your differential. Always keep an eye on the fluid. Fluid seeping from the pinion seal is normal on these cars, but if it begins to drip onto the floor have it replaced.

    3. If your rear end makes a considerable amount of noise, or you have had gears installed and the noise continually gets worse, consider having the car looked at. Failure of individual parts can trigger others to fail as well, so try and fix the problem before it gets any worse.

    How do I beef up my 10 bolt?

    You don't.

    It seems like too easy of an answer, but it holds true. The 10 bolt will always be limited by the fact that it is simply smaller than a 12 bolt, 9 inch, or Dana 60. Smaller = weaker.

    Besides replacing the ring & pinion and bearings, adding aftermarket parts such as stronger axles only seems to be a waste of money. The minute you fix one thing, another will break. Rear end installs can be costly if you are not doing the labor yourself - it adds up quick. Don't be the guy who says he can't afford a 12 bolt, but has spent $1500 dumping money into his 10 bolt.

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