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Camshaft Guide - Information / Write up

This is a discussion on Camshaft Guide - Information / Write up within the Internal Engine forums, part of the LSx Technical Help Section category; When deciding a cam, there are many things to think about. From the application, goal, to driveability, there are many ...

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    Post Camshaft Guide - Information / Write up

    When deciding a cam, there are many things to think about. From the application, goal, to driveability, there are many questions that require answers. The first few are questions that need to be answered in your thread or post if you asking this forum their opinion on what cam is for you. These are must haves. This thread will discuss almost everything possible camshaft related. From installs, requirements, questions/answers needed, Technical terms, How to's and some pricing.

    Stock Camshaft Numbers -

    Base Circle Dia.:
    '97-'04 LS1 = 19.7mm / 0.776"
    '01 LS6 = 19.3mm / 0.760"
    '02 -'04 LS6 = 19.0mm / 0.748

    1997-2000
    0.472/0.479, 202/210 on 117

    2001 LS1
    .500/0.500, 198/208 on 115.5LSA

    2001 LS6
    0.525/0.525, 204/211 on 116

    2002 LS6
    0.551/0.547, 204/218 on 117.5

    GMPP Hot Cam
    218/227 int/exh @ 0.05" duration
    0.525" / 0.525" int/exh lift
    112 LSA

    6.0 LQ9
    207/196 int/exh @ 0.05" duration
    0.479" / 0.467" int/exh lift
    116 LSA

    This note taken from our sponsor's website, Kyspeed.com
    New for the 2002 Corvette, the 405hp camshaft for the LS6 engine option. Please note that this cam has approximately a 0.050 smaller base circle than a stock LS1 camshaft. This smaller base circle will require longer pushrods for applications with stock length valves and no milling for the head surface. It is imperative that you check your pushrod length when purchasing this cam. The 2002 Z06 cylinder heads use a longer valve to make-up this difference!

    Advertised Duration Exh.: 282
    Advertised Duration Int.: 270
    Camshaft Duration @ 0.050 in. I/E: 204 / 218
    Camshaft Lift (in.) I/E: 0.551 / 0.541
    Camshaft Type: Hydraulic Roller
    Lobe Seperation Angle: 117.5
    RPM Range: 2000 to 6200

    "Near" Complete Camshaft Swap Parts List -

    Tools Needed - CLICK HERE

    Camshaft
    Chrome Moly Pushrods [1]
    Valve Springs - Upgraded
    Ported Oil Pump [1]
    Timing Chain
    Timing Gears [1]
    6-7 quarts of oil
    Oil Filter
    1-2 gallons of coolant
    Gasket kit
    Head Gasket Kit [2]
    Tune
    Valve Spring Compressor [3]
    Air Hose Tool - To hold valves up [3]
    Two 5/16's wooden dowels or, [3]
    Speed Inc's Lifter holder metal rods [3]
    Extra Valve Locks (Keepers) - [3]
    Loc Tite - Red [3]
    Head Bolts - (Stock or ARP) [2]
    Crank Pulley Bolt - (Stock or ARP)
    Lifters (LS7) [1] [2]
    LS2 Lifter trays [1] [2]


    [1] Note - Most, if not all will recommend buying these parts. They may not be a part that will not allow you to finish the job, but from a longevity aspect, they are highly recommended

    [2] Note - This part will be needed if swapping heads, or changing lifters/trays

    [3] Note - This part/tool (s) are required if doing the camshaft swap yourself, not paying a shop to install.

    Questions to Answer if asking for Camshaft Advice

    *If you start a thread, asking for camshaft referrals or advice, answering these questions will greatly help in getting you the answers you want*

    1.What size engine displacement? Stock, stroker?

    2. What heads? Stockers? Aftermarket? Milled? 5.3's? 5.7's? Need to know this.

    3. Where do you REALLY want the power? Even though all these cams claim the same basic power band, does not mean that's where it is. A 228/228 is going to have a greater "power under the curve". When A MS3 is going to want to be spun higher to see the gains that a cam this size should show. There are cams out there that don't mind stock heads. But the MS series really like ported heads and a steep gear. Some may disagree. I'm using these two cams as a reference because they seem very popular around here. They are two completely different animals. Learn where and why. Power is completely different with the two cams listed above. Maybe try and find a happy medium.

    4. How important is that "choppy idle" sound to you? Some people ask about cams a say they really just want a "choppy idle". If this is what your going for, do it. But buying a cam based on what sound its going to make is crazy, and you likely be disappointed.

    5. What are you going to be doing with it? That is a very important question. Is this JUST a Daily Driver car? Will it see more strip(1/4, 1/8) then the street, or a mix of the two?

    6.What are your other mods? Many, myself included disagree with putting a different cam in with zero exhaust work done. Long Tube headers, x pipe and cat back IMO is required. There are other setups, True duals sound great and flow great. Also a 4" Mufflex exhaust like mine. They all serve the same purpose. Your cam will like you for doing this first. Unless you don't mind choking the crap out of your 1000+ investment of a cam swap.

    7. How much are you willing to spend? A cam swap is not cheap by any means. You can figure at least $1000 for the cam swap and component's. Plus a tune. Which, with MOST cams, is a absolute necessity. Your looking at around 1500. Plus labor if your not doing your own work. Then its funny how things add up. Maybe an under drive pulley? Injectors? A steeper gear? Getting rid of that horrible LS1 intake? Things can add up very quickly.

    8. Be realistic with your cam. Just because you found 20 videos of a wild cammed F-body, vette, doesn't always mean that's whats right for you. Impulse buying is bad, and will cost you alot of money. RESEARCH. READ. The cam is the most important piece of your engine. It is essentially the "Brain" of your engine.

    9. What Transmission? If auto, you WILL NEED a high stall converter. See number 7 above If your a M6, plan on saving for a rear end if you want to put any of that new power to the ground. With auto transmission, you want to MATCH the cam choice with the stall. That is VERY important. Again, don't just start buying parts without a good idea of where you want the car to be when its "done".

    10. A custom cam can be great. Sometimes there's no way around it. There are 100's of off the shelf grinds out there. Start reading and looking at dino graphs to see if you like the power band.

    11. Suspension. You can have that nasty cam with gobs of power. But think about suspension. Its not the most fun thing to buy (at least in my eyes) but it makes a difference and you will need it.

    12. Match your heads to your cam. Big runners mean low air velocity. Which in turn means low "low end" torque. And vise versa, a smaller runner runs out of breath up top for a larger cubed motor. PRC seem to be making great numbers, and you can not go wrong with the AFR 205's on a stock cubed LS1/2/6. But they are pricey. But the mid range power/Torque on those heads are simply amazing. Its up to you. But you see where this is going. Match your mods. Plan it out, and don't piece it together. RESEARCH. READ.

    13. Springs and Lift - A high lift with a nasty ramp rate (lobe on camshaft gets steeper)will require two things. A dual spring, which costs more. And, you will want to be changing springs approximately every 15,000-20,000 miles depending on your cam's lobe profile and lift. That's purely MY OPINION. It could be more, or less depending on your setup. Its just one more thing to keep in mind when looking for camshafts. FOR ANY CAMSHAFT SWAP, YOU MUST CHANGE VALVESPRINGS. STOCK SPRINGS CAN ONLY HANDLE A STOCK CAMSHAFT. If your swapping your cam without removing your heads, this valve spring compressor works GREAT. It will save you time, and maybe money. You don't need the air hose fitting if your removing your heads. That is used to fill the cylinder with compressed air to hold your valves up. This is the Crane Cams tool now offered by Speed Inc. SPEED INC VALVE SPRING TOOL

    .
    Last edited by Hi-Po; 12-29-2009 at 10:13 AM.

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    Information here taken directly from Crane Cams website on Valve Springs GOOD READ, VERY INFORMATIVE!

    What is Valve Spring Installed Height?
    Installed height (also called assembled height) is the dimension measured from the bottom of the outer edge of the valve spring retainer where the outer valve spring locates, to the spring pocket in the cylinder head, when the valve is closed.

    How does installed Height affect spring tension?
    Installed height is the determining factor of what the valve spring "closed tension" or "seat pressure" will be. The camshaft specification card, and the spring section of the catalog both show what the approximate tension a particular valve spring will exert if installed at a specific height.

    For example, spring part number 99848 shows 114 lbs. @ 1.700". This means that if this spring is installed at a height of 1.700" it should exert 114 lbs. of tension with the valve closed. (Note: Spring tensions often vary measurably within the same production runs; therefore, it is recommended that each spring be tested on an accurate spring tester and the spring installed at the recommended seat pressure.)

    How do you change installed height and what effect does it have?
    The easiest way to shorten installed height is to insert a shim in the spring pocket below the valve spring. Another is to use a different design valve spring retainer. Retainers with a deeper dish will have more installed height, with a shallower dish, less installed height. You can also use a valve lock designed to change the location where the retainer is positioned on the valve stem. We sell heavy-duty, machined valve locks in std. height and also +.050 and -.050 heights to fine tune your installation. Longer length valves can be used to increase installed height.





    The shorter the installed height (the more the spring is compressed), the higher the valve spring seat pressure will be, and the less distance the spring can travel before the spring reaches coil bind.

    The taller the installed height, the lower the valve spring seat pressure will be, and the further the spring can travel before coil bind occurs.

    (Note: Eliminating coil bind by installing the spring at a taller installed height is not a desirable option. The resulting reduced seat pressure will lead to a significant loss in performance and could also result in engine damage caused by the valve bouncing on the valve seat due to the reduced seat pressure. The best procedure is to select a spring that provides the desired seat pressure at the installed height on the head.)

    What is the importance of valve spring seat pressure?
    Adequate seat pressure is necessary to:

    A) Insure tight contact between the valve face and the valve seat to seal the combustion chamber and provide proper heat transfer from the valve to the cylinder head.

    B) Keep the valve from bouncing on its return to the seat. If the valve bounces, cylinder pressure (power) is lost. Repeated bouncing of the valve is like a hammering action that can result in the head of the valve deforming ("tuliping") or actually breaking from the valve stem resulting in catastrophic engine failure.

    C) With a hydraulic cam the valve spring must exert enough pressure against the valve lifter (or lash adjuster) plunger to keep it centered in its travel to prevent "lifter pump-up". When pump-up occurs the valve is held slightly off its seat resulting in a significant loss of power and possibly a misfire. It is this loss of power and misfire that is often misdiagnosed as a fuel system or ignition system problem.

    High oil pressures and high viscosity oils aggravate "lifter pump-up" in hydraulic lifters. When either oil pressure or oil viscosity is going to be increased beyond the manufacturer's recommendation, a corresponding increase in spring seat pressure is necessary to prevent "pump-up" (even with an "anti-pump-up" lifter). Since oil viscosity in no way relates to the oil's film strength, and the scuffing protection provided by the film strength, Crane Cams recommends following the OE manufacturer's recommendation with respect to engine oil.

    Common Misconception:
    Many people mistakenly think that using higher seat pressures causes a reduction in the horsepower delivered to the flywheel because higher seat pressures (and also higher spring rates required for high performance) require horsepower to compress the springs. This thinking is simply incomplete! For every valve that is opening and its valve spring being compressed, another valve is closing and its valve spring is expanding. This expansion returns the energy to the valve train and the engine. This results in a net power loss of "0" hp. Many engineering texts refer to this as the "regenerative characteristic" of the valve train. Recent tests at Crane have shown no horsepower loss on a hydraulic roller equipped engine when changing the seat pressure from 135# to 165#. Power actually improved significantly at top end, probably due to better control of the relatively heavy valves in the engine.

    In Summary:
    Always run enough seat pressure to control the valve action as it returns to the seat. Heavier valves require more seat pressure. Strong, lightweight valves require less seat pressure. When in doubt, run slightly more seat pressure . . . not less.

    What is Valve Spring Open Pressure and Why is it Important?
    Open pressure is the pressure against the retainer when the valve is at its maximum open point. Adequate open pressure is necessary to control the valve lifter as it first accelerates up the opening flank of the cam lobe and then quickly decelerates to pass over the nose of the cam which causes the valve to change direction. Inadequate open pressure will allow the lifter to "loft" or "jump" over the nose of the cam (referred to as "valve train separation", or "valve float"). When the lifter strikes the closing flank with a severe impact, camshaft life is drastically shortened.

    Open pressure is a function of seat pressure, net valve lift, and spring rate. It must be sufficient to control the valve action at the highest expected engine speed without being excessive. Excessive open pressure aggravates pushrod flexing which in itself aggravates "lofting" of the valve and valve train separation. Selecting a spring to give the proper open pressure, while minimizing pushrod flexing, provides many opportunities for developing a unique, horsepower-enhancing combination. Obviously, lightweight valves require lower open pressures and tend to reduce pushrod flexing and valve train separation.

    One final point: Excessive valve spring open pressure will result in reduced camshaft and lifter life.

    What is a Valve Spring Coil Bind and how does it relate to spring travel and valve lift?
    When the valve spring is compressed until its coils touch one another and can travel no further, it is said to be in coil bind. The catalog shows the approximate coil bind height for the various Crane Cams valve springs. To measure this you must install the retainer in the valve spring, then compress the spring until it coil binds. Now measure from the bottom side of the retainer to the bottom of the spring. This measurement is the coil bind height. This can be done on the cylinder head with a spring compression tool (part number 99417-1), in a bench vise, or in a professional valve spring tester.





    Using the above figure, subtract the coil bind height "B" from the valve spring installed height "A". The difference "C" is the maximum spring travel. The spring travel must always be at least .060" greater than the full lift of the valve. This safety margin of .060" (or more) is necessary to avoid the dangers of coil bind and over-stressing the spring.

    If coil bind occurs, the resulting mechanical interference will severely damage the camshaft and valve train components.

    How do you increase spring travel?
    The valve spring must have sufficient travel (plus .060" safety margin) to accommodate the amount of valve lift created by the camshaft and/or an increase in rocker arm ratio. To increase spring travel you can either raise the installed height (but this will lessen the spring tension), or change to a spring with additional travel. If there is not a standard diameter spring available with enough travel, the cylinder heads will have to be machined and a larger outside diameter (O.D.) spring installed.

    Besides coil bind, what other types of mechanical interference should you look for?
    When you increase the valve lift with a bigger cam or increased rocker arm ratio, you must be sure there is no interference between any of the moving parts. Some of the components that must be inspected for clearance are:

    D) The distance from the bottom of the valve spring retainer and the top of the valve stem guide, or the top of the valve stem seal, must be equal to the net valve lift of the valve, plus at least .060" more for clearance.
    Last edited by Hi-Po; 12-10-2009 at 08:37 PM.

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    E) When using rocker arms mounted on a stud, the length of the slot in the rocker arm body must be inspected to be sure it is long enough to avoid binding on the stud. The ends of the slot must be at least .060" away from the stud when the rocker is at full valve lift and when the valve is closed. Be especially careful when using stock Chevy stamped steel rockers and any high performance stock or aftermarket cam. These rockers will typically not provide enough clearance at full-lift, and will bind on the rocker stud.

    F) The underside of the rocker arm body cannot touch the valve spring retainer. You will need at least .040" clearance to the retainer throughout the full movement of the rocker arm. If necessary, a different shape retainer or rocker arm design will be required. In some cases, installing a lash cap on the tip of the valve stem can provide the clearance required.

    G) Valve to piston clearance must be checked to be sure there is sufficient clearance. The intake valve must have at least .100" clearance to the piston and at least .120" clearance on the exhaust valve.

    What is the critical point of crank rotation for checking valve to piston clearance?
    The critical point for both valves is the "Overlap Period" as the exhaust cycle is ending and the intake cycle is beginning. You must start checking the clearance before and continue after T.D.C. on both the intake and exhaust valves to be sure you have the correct readings through the overlap period.

    If your doing your own cam swap, especially one with a big duration (230+) and high lift (.610" / .620"+) You need to read this and make sure your setting your valve springs up correctly. As its very important. Here is a tool to measure your spring height for the DIYer. VALVE SPRING HEIGHT MICROMETER

    14 Reviews - There are many reviews on the Internet on most of the well known camshafts. Reading a review from a person who may or may not have the same drivability requirements or power needs as you on the Internet is silly. Find people in your area, on regional forums, car clubs etc and try to meet them for a 'feel' of their camshaft. Don't let YouTube videos or a track oriented car persuade you into a certain camshaft.

    15. Emission camshafts - Overlap is the killer when attempting to pass emissions. Overlap of a camshaft can easily be attained by using the following formula. [Intake duration + Exauast duration] /4 - LSA x 2 = Overlap

    Generally speaking, -4 to -6 overlap pass's California's emissions standards. Heres a small list I may update with more, or others will,

    MS4=18.5 (111 LSA)
    TRex= 23 (111 LSA)
    Tqr2= 6 (113 LSA)
    TSP 224/224= -4 (114 LSA)
    TSP 228R= 0 (114 LSA)
    TR Reverse Split= -2.5(114 LSA)
    cheaTR= -12 (117 LSA)


    16. How to Degree a Camshaft - CARCRAFTS DEGREEING Also COMP'S DEGREEING AlsoLUNATI'S DEGREEINGAlso
    CRANES DEGREEING Those are all great resources for learning to degree your new camshaft. It is highly recommended, but not required that you degree your camshaft.

    17. How to Install a Camshaft -
    www.ls1howto.com
    If you have some basic mechanical skills, some basic tools, and some time, you can easily install your own camshaft.

    18. Camshaft Glossary - Instead of me putting the terms I know into definition that may be off slightly, Most of these are from CPGnation

    Advance – Most commonly refers to combustion timing. Engine timing advance refers to crankshaft timing with regards to achieving piston Top Dead Center (TDC) prior to the combustion event within a cylinder. With regards to advance for camshaft timing – another meaning is the relationship of the intake centerline to TDC of the piston

    (Subtracting the ICL from the LSA will give you the advance: Example, My camshaft is a 114LSA and a 110 ICL = 4* advanced.)

    Area under the curve – Describes what a valve-lift cycle would look like if plotted on a graph with time in crank degrees running horizontally and valve lift in thousandths of an inch running vertically. The more quickly the valve opens and dwells in that position, the greater the space from opening to closing or beneath the curve.

    Duration – The amount of time the lobe is creating lift measured in degrees of camshaft rotation



    Lifter preload – The initial pressure applied to the lifter most often through the rocker arm system.

    Lobe separation angle – The number of degrees between the intake and exhaust lobe centerlines.

    Intake centerline – The midpoint of the lobe (which may or may not be maximum lift, since some cams are asymmetrical in design).

    Installed height – The overall measurement of the valve spring when installed from the spring seat to the top of the retainer.

    Lift – The amount of travel by the lifter from the “zero location” on the camshaft up to the nose of the cam lobe. That measurement multiplied by the rocker arm ratio generates the total valve lift figure.

    Piston to valve clearance – The clearance between the valve and the piston when the two are at their closest point.

    Open pressure – Spring pressure created when the valve is open. There needs to be enough pressure at this point to generate valve train control.

    O.D and I.D – Outside diameter and inside diameter measurements.

    Ramp speed (aggressiveness of lobe profile) – Refers to the ramp angle of the camshaft lobe. The more aggressive the lobe ramp, the faster the valve opens and closes.

    Retard – The opposite of the advance event; refers to something that occurs after the combustion event within the cylinder.

    (Retarding the timing does the opposite of advancing. It will push the power band up higher, resulting in more top end power)

    Rocker arm ratio – The differential between the pushrod and valve stem side of the rocker axis point, expressed as a ratio.

    Seat pressure – The pressure most commonly in pounds per square inch – exerted on the spring seat. This can be during rest – when the valve is closed.

    Shim – A thin flat disc in varying thicknesses used to adjust (compress) the valve spring’s installed height.

    Single and Dual pattern camshafts – When the intake and exhaust specifications (lift and duration) on the camshaft are the same, this is a single pattern camshaft. When the intake and exhaust specifications are different, this is a dual pattern camshaft

    Symmetrical vs. Asymmetrical lobes – When the opening and closing halves of the camshaft lobes are different, they are called asymmetrical lobes. Generally, the opening ramp is more aggressive on these lobes with a longer, slower closing ramp.

    Split Duration Camshaft – A camshaft where the intake and exhaust duration specifications are different.

    Top Dead Center (TDC) – The highest point achieved by the piston travel within the cylinder bore.

    Valve float – The point at which the intake lifter and the camshaft lobe are not tracking at the same moment. This is an extremely dangerous event and can, in its most extreme condition, cause valve contact with the piston. Regardless, the peak engine efficiency is not present.

    Valve Lash – A measurement taken between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm tip. Valve lash is always measured with the lifter positioned off the lobe of the cam. This measurement is taken while adjusting a solid lifter valve train.

    Valve Margin – The distance from the face of the valve straight up the side of the valve to the bottom edge of the valve seat.

    Valve Overlap – This is a function of both duration and lobe separation angle. If the lobe separation angle remains the same but you increase the duration, the amount of overlap will also increase. Overlap is the time, measured in crankshaft degrees, when the exhaust valve and intake valves are both open.

    (Intake duration + Exauast duration /4 - LSA x 2 = overlap)

    Timing Chains -

    The stock LS1 timing chain is prone to failures on higher HP applications because of its slimmer design and chance of having excess slop (play) in them. The cheapest upgrade is the LS2 chain. It is a cheap upgrade, but a very good one. There are many options out there for double roller timing chain setups, in the past I and many others stayed away from them due to the fact that there where/are clearance issues with the oil pump. A LS2 chain is PLENTY for 7000 RPMs and 450-550 (probably more, just covering my backside) RWHP. By far the best single row chain setup is the, Cloyes Hex adjust and the IRL chain. Those chains are not produced anymore, but SDPC parts still has some stock of them. They are pricey though. Adjustable Timing chains allow you to install the camshaft at different ICL's.
    Last edited by Hi-Po; 12-10-2009 at 10:59 PM.

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    Timing Tutorial, From COMP Cams
    CLICK HERE

    19. Valve Spring Locks -
    Stock valve lock degree is 7*. 10* may be required in extreme high lift and high RPM. For mosr applications though, a 7* lock will be perfectly fine. Valve locks are also referred to as "valve keepers"

    20. How to Determine Proper Valvetrain Geometry
    This link is a nice page with good pictures that breaks it down for you nicely.

    Lunati - How to CLICK HERE

    21. How a camshaft works -

    This website is a good all around learning spot. It describes the 3 different designs.

    HOW A CAMSHAFT WORKS



    1. Max Lift or Nose
    2. Flank
    3. Opening Clearance Ramp
    4. Closing Clearance Ramp
    5. Base Circle
    6. Exhaust Opening Timing Figure
    7. Exhaust Closing Timing Figure
    8. Intake Opening Timing Figure
    9. Intake Closing Timing Figure
    10. Intake to Exhaust Lobe Separation

    22. Lobe seperation Angle - More information.

    Condition --Wide Separation Angle -----Narrow Separation Angle
    Overlap -------------Decreased -------------- Increased
    Low End Power ------Higher ------------------ Lower
    High End Power ------Lower------------------- Higher
    Detonation Potential- Lower ------------------- Higher
    Intake Events --------Later --------------------Earlier
    Exhaust Events ------Earlier --------------------Later
    Manifold Vacuum ------Higher------------------ Lower

    LSA has a direct relationship to amount of overlap on a cam. Cams with identical duration and lift specifications can have very different LSAs. Generally speaking, a wide LSA will produce greater low end torque and a narrow separation angle will produce better top end power. LSA is ground into the cam at the factory and cannot be changed. A wider LSA figure, (112*-116*), moves the lobe centerlines further apart and will smooth your idle due to the decrease in overlap that it creates. The lower the figure, (106*-110*), moves the centerlines closer and will increase bottom end power, but your idle will suffer along with it.


    Common Camshaft Dyno Graphs -

    If you have a cam, with graph and a basic mod list not posted here. Lets get that information all in one thread.

    ASA Cam - 226/236 .525/.525 110 lsa
    Pacesetter LT's, Pace Y-Pipe, Cutout, 3" exhuast
    Click for full size

    ASA Cam - 226/236 .525/.525 110 LSA
    Stock LS6 heads, full bolt ons, M6 Trans
    Click for full size

    MTI X1 Camshaft
    2005 GTO LS2
    Stock Heads
    Kooks 1 7/8" Headers
    3" Catted Connection Pipes
    Borla Catback Exhaust
    160 Thermostat
    MTI UD Pulley
    FAST 90/90 Ported TB
    Click for full size

    230/232 .595"/.595 on 114 LSA cam
    Transmission ----T56
    Bolt-ons, LS6 Intake, Stock Heads
    Click for full size

    226/228 .585/.588 114lsa 113icl
    Stock heads, flowtech headers, ASP pulley, SLP lid, LS6 intake, 918 springs
    Click for full size

    228/228 588/588 112LSA
    PRC 5.3's, Dynatech LT's w/hi-flow cats. Stock intake, stock tb, stock injectors & no u/d pulley. Centerforce DF clutch
    Click for full size

    Thunder Racing 224/224 114lsa
    UDP, Kooks LT's, Stock rear, Stock M6 Trans
    Click for full size

    SI4 - 228/228 .588/.588 113LSA ICL Unknown
    M6 trans, Mods unknown, Probably basic bolt ons, stock rear
    Click for full size

    TSP 228/228 .588 .588 112
    hooker lts, tsp y pipe, LS1 intake, M6 Trans
    Click for full size
    (390 hp 372 torque)

    218/222 114lsa
    M6 Trans, Stock 10 bolt rear, Stock LS6 heads
    Click for full size

    TR 230/224 .575/.563 111LSA
    LS6 intake, Hooker headers, M6 Trans, Stock 241 heads, stock rear
    Click for full size

    Comp Cams 232/238 .595/.605 112+2 LSA
    Hooker headers, LS6 intake, AUTO/2800, 3.73 gears, pulley
    Click for full size

    MS3 - 237/242, .603"/.609 112 LSA
    Pacesetter LTs & 3" ORY, M6 Trans,

    Click for full size

    MS4 - 239/242, .649"/.609"
    6.0 liter(LQ4), Ported 243 heads, 12 bolt/4.10s
    Click for full size

    Torquer 2 - 232/234 .595/.598
    Limited known, Auto, Fuddle 3400
    Click for full size

    Torquer V.2 - 232/234, .595"/.598
    FAST 92/92 ported, SLP LT's, TrickFlow 215's, AUTO/FTI 3600
    Click for full size

    Torquer V.3 - 231/234, .643"/.598 111LSA
    PRC 2.5 LS6 Heads, FAST 92/92, Pulley, ARH LT, Exhaust, Fabbed 9"/4.11's, M6 Trans
    Click for full size


    Thunder racing "Cheatr" Cam - 214/230 .601/.575 117 LSA
    AFR Heads,
    Click for full size
    AFR heads, FAST intake, Full bolt ons', TR CheaTR cam
    Click for full size

    TRex - 242/248 - .608/.612 - 110 lsa
    stock heads, full bolt-on parts, including long tube headers, pulley, LS6 intake manifold, Whisper lid, ported throttle body.
    Click for full size

    LG Motorsports - G5X3 - ..................... -
    1 3/4 headers, LS6 manifold, Moser 9"/4.11's, M6 trans
    Click for full size

    LG Motorsports - G5X1 - .............. 112LSA
    LT's, True duals, Pulley
    Click for full size

    LG MotorSports - G5X3 -
    LG Pro LT's -
    Click for full size



    Futural F14 - 232/234 .646/.612
    Pacesetter LT, Pace Y-pipe, Dual cutouts, LS6 Intake
    Click for full size






    As always, the people who really know the cams better than most any of us, is the people who grind them. COMP, Futural, Cam Motion, LG MOTORSPORTS all are great cam companies.
    Last edited by 0rion; 01-12-2010 at 02:39 AM.

  5. #5
    Veteran Hi-Po's Avatar
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    ......

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    LSwut tep98ws6's Avatar
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    Another awesome write up! Thank you

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    ..........

  8. #8
    Junior Member
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    Hello Moderator,

    Can you please make this a STICKY?

    Great information, Thank you!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Z28boy2000's Avatar
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    2000 Camaro B4C

    woah great write up, i see a sticky coming soon

  10. #10
    Veteran Hi-Po's Avatar
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    Updated with Common Dyno Graphs.

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    formally 01 T/A 0verkill's Avatar
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    "Arrest Me Red"
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    you are on the write up ball hi-po good work as alway. i have to go to bed and sleep after all that.i say sticky

  12. #12
    NYSpeed.com WhatUpWhatUp's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    very helpful! thanx

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    What brand of cam is the 230/232 595/595 cam in this thread.. its the size of cam I am looking for and the curve looks like what I want as well...
    just need to know who makes that particular cam from that dyno graph

  14. #14
    Veteran Hi-Po's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by soundengineer View Post
    What brand of cam is the 230/232 595/595 cam in this thread.. its the size of cam I am looking for and the curve looks like what I want as well...
    just need to know who makes that particular cam from that dyno graph
    To be honest, I don't know. When I found the graph, that's all it said. Now, you can call any of the cam grinders I listed above, and have them custom grind you anything you want. Call and ask for that cam, research alittle, or ask them what lobe design they recommend and roll with it. I believe that was a custom cam anyway, as they did not list a 'name'. Otherwise, I would have noted it. Hope that helps.

  15. #15
    Impounded chknhwk01's Avatar
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    Post What do you thing of this?????

    A COMP CAM 236/236/ 600/601 ON A 112 LSA, WITH HENDRICKS,
    HEADS, HOOKER,S LONG TUNES, HOOKER Y-PIPE, SLP LOUD MOUTH,BACK
    90MM, WORK LS6, MADOFOLD, 410 REAR, MOSER, A FULL SPOHN, UNDER,,
    28'' HOOSER, Q,T,PRO, 9010 UP FRONT, 50,50 1N THE REAR, 3.5 UP FRONT,
    A SUPER TUNE, IN A 2001 T/A, 3100 POUNDS, WITH A NEW N.O.S. PLATE,
    200 SHOT.. THU A FULL SUPER CUNCH SET UP..
    AND A SPOHN PRO STOCK TORG ARM??????????
    Last edited by chknhwk01; 01-26-2010 at 01:49 PM.

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    Member Siciliano15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hi-Po View Post
    Stock Camshaft Numbers -

    Base Circle Dia.:
    '97-'04 LS1 = 19.7mm / 0.776"
    '01 LS6 = 19.3mm / 0.760"
    '02 -'04 LS6 = 19.0mm / 0.748

    1997-2000
    0.472/0.479, 202/210 on 117

    2001 LS1
    .500/0.500, 198/208 on 115.5LSA
    i think u may have switched the stock ls1 cam numbers. the 1998-2000 was the one with the higher lift and duration and the 2001-2002 had the smaller cam. correct me if im wrong but it should be:

    98-00
    496/496, 202/210 on 117

    01-02
    467/479, 198/208 on 115.5

  17. #17
    Veteran Hi-Po's Avatar
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    I had conflicting notes there. First was telling me,

    2001 - 2002 Fbody
    197/207 int/exh @ 0.05" duration
    0.467" / 0.479" int/exh lift
    116 LSA

    and

    1998 - 2000 Fbody
    202/210 int/exh @ 0.05" duration
    0.496" / 0.496" int/exh lift
    116 LSA

    Looks like our notes are different still slightly I had saved my work in this thread so many times so I didnt lose it all, looks like I got that page when I finally made the thread.

    Then the further I went into it, I got numbers that neither you or I have written down. I have found 3 different sources for these numbers. I wanted the numbers I just posted, as those are what I have seen more times as stock numbers. They differ slightly from yours.

  18. #18
    Member Siciliano15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hi-Po View Post
    I had conflicting notes there. First was telling me,

    2001 - 2002 Fbody
    197/207 int/exh @ 0.05" duration
    0.467" / 0.479" int/exh lift
    116 LSA

    and

    1998 - 2000 Fbody
    202/210 int/exh @ 0.05" duration
    0.496" / 0.496" int/exh lift
    116 LSA

    Looks like our notes are different still slightly I had saved my work in this thread so many times so I didnt lose it all, looks like I got that page when I finally made the thread.

    Then the further I went into it, I got numbers that neither you or I have written down. I have found 3 different sources for these numbers. I wanted the numbers I just posted, as those are what I have seen more times as stock numbers. They differ slightly from yours.
    not sure about the durations or lsa's but i do know the lift was higher on the 98-2000 because any high ratio rocker requires new valvesprings on those but not on the newer cars. supposedly when the ls6 manifold was introduced they gave the cars a smaller cam to increase torque and keep the power levels similar to what they were while getting rid of the egr system

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    Smile

    I found a lot of interesting and useful information ....
    leomartin6

  20. #20
    Junior Member Mr. D's Avatar
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    1956 Chevy 210 Wagon

    Question:

    I read that lower LSA numbers create more low rpm torque and make the idle a little rougher, but how do lower LSA numbers affect (1.) vacuum as per power brake operation, and (2.) general overall mileage at 2000 to 3000 rpm?

    I'm looking for a cam for a 350 small block with good Alumn Heads, roller rockers and a Edelbrock Perfromer Intake hooked up to a 700R for a Cruise Night '56 Chevy Wagon. I'm looking for good power from off idle to 5000 rpm without any problems with low vacuum as per power brakes. Any experience with the Edelbrock 2103 Performer Plus Cam???? It sounds like a good mild choice for a Cruise Night Car.

    Opinions on this cam??


    Last edited by Mr. D; 06-09-2010 at 12:07 AM.

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