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royal purple vs pp

This is a discussion on royal purple vs pp within the General Help forums, part of the LSx Technical Help Section category; Will that hold up on a 15 ton truck that hauls 24-25 tons?...

  1. #21
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    Will that hold up on a 15 ton truck that hauls 24-25 tons?

  2. #22
    FAQ2 99DROPTOPZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge View Post
    This pretty much sums up PP versus Royal Purple.....I ran PP damn near double mileage and double the fuel dilution and still kicked the wear numbers all to hell with PP...
    Click for full size
    Thanks for posting this and the other data I'm definately making the switch to PP. This backs up all the he said/she said BS

  3. #23
    Grand Imperial Wizard Sarge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurraquio View Post
    Will that hold up on a 15 ton truck that hauls 24-25 tons?
    What engine you got?
    You must be hauling my wifes shoes around....25 tons sounds about right....

  4. #24
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    N14 500 cummings

  5. #25
    Grand Imperial Wizard Sarge's Avatar
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    LOL...I remember those when they had mechanical fuel injection.....yeah you want an oil that is Cummins CES 20081 rated for that motor....lemme see what we come up with....
    http://www.amsoil.com/storefront/deo...0&type=catalog
    http://www.shell.com/home/Framework?...asynthcj4.html
    Either one of those will do you well.....
    Last edited by Sarge; 07-23-2008 at 06:11 PM.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge View Post
    LOL...I remember those when they had mechanical fuel injection.....yeah you want an oil that is Cummins CES 20081 rated for that motor....lemme see what we come up with....
    http://www.amsoil.com/storefront/deo...0&type=catalog
    http://www.shell.com/home/Framework?...asynthcj4.html
    Either one of those will do you well.....
    thanks sarge. The N14 is a pretty good motor. lots and lots of torque.

  7. #27
    Member slpcamaro's Avatar
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    thanks so to walmart it is, I'll post on here as soon as I get the results back still gotta put a good 3000 miles on the pp once i get it in there.

  8. #28
    Grand Imperial Wizard Sarge's Avatar
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    I usually dont get a uoa on the first run as oftentimes you have residuals from your last oil and dont get a true reading....

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge View Post
    I usually dont get a uoa on the first run as oftentimes you have residuals from your last oil and dont get a true reading....
    good looking out then how many changed do you suggest I was going to run some cheap stuff through real quick. I always pour a quart of cheap shit through it to just push whatever's sitting in there out. I read you posting on the 2 stroke oil add to the gas, question my normal fill up is around 13.5 gallons tank i think is 15 so I was going to do 3 oz after a fill up but after that should I try for 2 1/2 or go 2 or 3 oz.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge View Post
    Man I love the Shell Rotella 5-40 Synthetic.
    X2 That Shell Rotella is some damn good oil.

  11. #31

    Post CompSyn's Recommendation

    Iíve read through this thread and have a few comments to add, for what itís worth. First, I want to say that Iím not going to down talk and bash other brands. That would not be a professional way to conduct business and Iíd just loose any ounce of credibility I might have here on LS1. So hold me to it. If you catch me saying negative things about another brand, just tell me to knock it off. Everyone obviously knows by now what Iíd recommend anyway, so I wonít recommend anything in this post.

    What I do want to touch on is getting people up on more practical ways of selecting the lubricants they use in their cars. And Iíll just put the disclaimer up now. Iím not an oil expert nor claim to be one. However, Amsoil makes sure there is no shortage of materials available to its network of dealers. So Iíve read lots and have lots of information available to me. Iíve also established a network of seasoned professionals inside of Amsoil and outside of Amsoil where I can get information from. If I donít have the answer to something I will do my best to find out.

    So Iím going to take a stab at it and say that everyone who has posted in this thread cares about what they put into their car and want to know what brand of lubricant has the best quality and value for their hard earned dollar. My recommendation is to take some time and download some Typical Physical Properties data sheets that the oil manufacturers provide online. Compare things like the Viscosity Index (VI). The Total Base Number (TBN). Try to find out if the oil is a group II, III or IV base stock. If you canít find what you are looking for, call them and ask for it. By doing these things, I think you will start to see why some oils cost more than others, why some are disliked, why others are recommended and highly rated.

    Beyond that, there are a number of oil analysis labs available to the public, some more trusted than others. Ask around and find one you are comfortable with and start doing some Used Oil Analysis (UOA), and perhaps some Virgin Oil Analysis (VOA). Do your own testing and compare the results.

    This is what Ed Kellerman, Manager of Oil Analyzers Inc. said about UOAs in an email inquiry I wrote to him earlier this year:

    ďIn response to your inquiry, oil analysis is generally a good way to compare used oil samples. There may be variables however that are uncontrollable such as bad batch of fuel, driving conditions, fuel dilution, condensation, differences in loads, etcÖ If any of the preceding occur while using one oil and do not happen using the other oil then you have an unfair comparison. Assuming that all conditions remain close to the same, you can then start looking at oil performance factors.Ē

    Knowing this, make sure you are scientific about comparing UOAs. For example, donít put 3000 miles on one oil test and then 5000 on the other. Try and keep the test data as equal as possible. Also, Sarge was correct with what he said about comparing oils using UOAs. Itís a good idea to run the oil being tested through at least a couple Oil Change Intervals (OCI). Doing so will allow the new oil to purge out left over contaminants and old oil from the prior oil change providing a more meaningful test result.
    In all honesty, I realize some will read this post and say, whatever, itís only oil, change it and run it. Why spend so much effort with your oil? The reason, a consumer needs to cut through all the advertising jargon that is dumped on them and use real world experience and tests to determine what works best for their application.

    Know what you are paying for and then use with confidence.

    CompSyn

  12. #32
    Grand Imperial Wizard Sarge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slpcamaro View Post
    good looking out then how many changed do you suggest I was going to run some cheap stuff through real quick. I always pour a quart of cheap shit through it to just push whatever's sitting in there out. I read you posting on the 2 stroke oil add to the gas, question my normal fill up is around 13.5 gallons tank i think is 15 so I was going to do 3 oz after a fill up but after that should I try for 2 1/2 or go 2 or 3 oz.
    Yeah I always use a flush oil when draining myself....but I am talking about utilizing your oil of choice for one OCI then taking the UOA from the 2nd run.
    Go 3oz....I use a 600:1 and may folks utilize a 400:1 so your safe with 3oz to 13.5 gallons easily.

  13. #33
    Grand Imperial Wizard Sarge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CompSyn View Post
    Iíve read through this thread and have a few comments to add, for what itís worth. First, I want to say that Iím not going to down talk and bash other brands. That would not be a professional way to conduct business and Iíd just loose any ounce of credibility I might have here on LS1. So hold me to it. If you catch me saying negative things about another brand, just tell me to knock it off. Everyone obviously knows by now what Iíd recommend anyway, so I wonít recommend anything in this post.

    What I do want to touch on is getting people up on more practical ways of selecting the lubricants they use in their cars. And Iíll just put the disclaimer up now. Iím not an oil expert nor claim to be one. However, Amsoil makes sure there is no shortage of materials available to its network of dealers. So Iíve read lots and have lots of information available to me. Iíve also established a network of seasoned professionals inside of Amsoil and outside of Amsoil where I can get information from. If I donít have the answer to something I will do my best to find out.

    So Iím going to take a stab at it and say that everyone who has posted in this thread cares about what they put into their car and want to know what brand of lubricant has the best quality and value for their hard earned dollar. My recommendation is to take some time and download some Typical Physical Properties data sheets that the oil manufacturers provide online. Compare things like the Viscosity Index (VI). The Total Base Number (TBN). Try to find out if the oil is a group II, III or IV base stock. If you canít find what you are looking for, call them and ask for it. By doing these things, I think you will start to see why some oils cost more than others, why some are disliked, why others are recommended and highly rated.

    Beyond that, there are a number of oil analysis labs available to the public, some more trusted than others. Ask around and find one you are comfortable with and start doing some Used Oil Analysis (UOA), and perhaps some Virgin Oil Analysis (VOA). Do your own testing and compare the results.

    This is what Ed Kellerman, Manager of Oil Analyzers Inc. said about UOAs in an email inquiry I wrote to him earlier this year:

    ďIn response to your inquiry, oil analysis is generally a good way to compare used oil samples. There may be variables however that are uncontrollable such as bad batch of fuel, driving conditions, fuel dilution, condensation, differences in loads, etcÖ If any of the preceding occur while using one oil and do not happen using the other oil then you have an unfair comparison. Assuming that all conditions remain close to the same, you can then start looking at oil performance factors.Ē

    Knowing this, make sure you are scientific about comparing UOAs. For example, donít put 3000 miles on one oil test and then 5000 on the other. Try and keep the test data as equal as possible. Also, Sarge was correct with what he said about comparing oils using UOAs. Itís a good idea to run the oil being tested through at least a couple Oil Change Intervals (OCI). Doing so will allow the new oil to purge out left over contaminants and old oil from the prior oil change providing a more meaningful test result.
    In all honesty, I realize some will read this post and say, whatever, itís only oil, change it and run it. Why spend so much effort with your oil? The reason, a consumer needs to cut through all the advertising jargon that is dumped on them and use real world experience and tests to determine what works best for their application.

    Know what you are paying for and then use with confidence.

    CompSyn
    Well said.

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