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Another question-Brake pads-do I need to bleed the system?

This is a discussion on Another question-Brake pads-do I need to bleed the system? within the General Help forums, part of the LSx Technical Help Section category; I changed my brake pads about a month ago with some shitty pads and now they are loud as can ...

  1. #1
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    Another question-Brake pads-do I need to bleed the system?

    I changed my brake pads about a month ago with some shitty pads and now they are loud as can be and brake dust loves my rims now. I desided to go with some badass pads and I am going to change them now. Do I need to bleed the system, or did I just get bad brake pads the first time?

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    Senior Member 02z28ls1's Avatar
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    If you didn't open the system up-you don't need to bleed the system out.But if you've never bled the system consider changing out the fluid as a preventative measure and can be a performance improver as well.Cheap pads without taking any noise prevention measures will certainly result in noisy dusty brakes.Lubricate the caliper slides with a high heat lubricant like "Sil-Glide" or something similar, and put alitlle on the backs of the pads.

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    Senior Member SeVeReDiStOrTiOn's Avatar
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    I'd bleed it if I were you, if you change the pads the right way anyway. Some people just push the calipers back without opening the bleeder screw...which pretty much shoves dirty ass fluid into your lines. When you sqeeze'em with a C-clamp, open your bleeder. They sell self bleeding systems now so you don't need 2 people. That's what I do anyway

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    Well, now that I know I will bleed the system, how do I do it? I am alittle slow when it comes to brakes. The most I have done is change the pads. Can anyone take me through step by step?

  5. #5
    LOLLIROT
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    i think they were jus bad break pads... maybe they werent good enough for your car.

  6. #6
    Senior Member 02z28ls1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by white01ws6
    Well, now that I know I will bleed the system, how do I do it? I am alittle slow when it comes to brakes. The most I have done is change the pads. Can anyone take me through step by step?
    It's actually pretty easy-I've been doing brakes professionally for 20+ years-so there may be some people disagree with me-but I do it this way all the time .If you're looking to change out as much fluid as possible-which is the best way to do this-and aren't in a big hurry-the easiest way is to gravity bleed.As the name implies-gravity does the work and you can do this by yourself.Get a turkey baster at the supermarket and suck the fluid out of the master cylinder.Using only fresh fluid from a sealed container-pick up a 32 oz. bottle of DOT 3 while you're out getting the baster-fill back up the reservoir. Now jack up the back of the vehicle and pull the wheels off.Put a drain pan under the right rear and open the bleeder.Let the fluid run out until it comes out like the new fluid-this can take a while so have patience and watch the level in the master so you don't run out.Once the right rear is coming out like new(close the bleeder) the other side rear won't take but a few minutes to do the same thing(and then close the bleeder).Put the wheels back on and move to the front and do the same thing-the front won't take as long-start with the right front.If the fluid won't start flowing on it's own in the back you can persuade it by gently pushing down on the brake pedal with the bleeder open until you see fluid coming out-then gently let the pedal back up-have patience and let it start flowing on it's after that and no air will remain in the brakes.Close the bleeder on the left front(your last wheel) and pump the pedal-your pedal should be hard and high at this point.With all new fluid in your system you will notice your brakes are working better and fade free.I do my own car and customer cars this way as preventative maintenance and a performance increaser .By all means feel free to ask any more questions you may still have and I'll try to answer them.

  7. #7
    Pepe LePew
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    wouldn't it be nice to have a rack to put your car on like a real pro?? I used to, but not any more...I would definitely have a professional flush the brake fluid. It does get trashy and ABS components dont behave like their supposed to when the system gets gunked up. that's one reason not to just push the pistons back into the calipers...if you absolutely HAVE to do it, then pinch the brake hose with some vise grips and open the bleeder valve before you spread 'em.

    As for the pads, I've used both Raybestos ceramics and now Wagner ceramics on mine. I'm moderately happier with the Wagners (I have about 6k on them). They are quiet and don't dust that much. Just be sure that you don't hammer your brakes too hard when they're new, or they will get noisy no matter what brand you use. Just brake as lightly as possible for about 50 stops and they should be OK.

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    Senior Member 02z28ls1's Avatar
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    navy blue
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    I was hoping people at least have a floor jack-if you don't -get one.Jack up the back and follow my directions-put the wheels back on and go to the front.If I didn't make that clear I apologize.I don't have a rack at home and I do this at home all the time.I think if you can change your own oil and simple stuff like that-you can flush your brake fluid.If you don't ever work on cars take it in to a shop and pay the man what he needs-just do this for your cars sake.

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    1SlowTA 00BlueTA's Avatar
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    Also to add to 02z28ls1's last post. If you havent done them too much and can't have someone who has help or supervise, it maybe better to take to a shop. Only reason I say this is because if you mess something up your sure to be a victim of the O SHIIIIIIII. . .

    When it comes to brakes, much like tires its always better to be safe than sorry.

    -00BlueTA

  10. #10
    Firehawk766
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    Quote Originally Posted by 02z28ls1
    It's actually pretty easy-I've been doing brakes professionally for 20+ years-so there may be some people disagree with me-but I do it this way all the time .If you're looking to change out as much fluid as possible-which is the best way to do this-and aren't in a big hurry-the easiest way is to gravity bleed.As the name implies-gravity does the work and you can do this by yourself.Get a turkey baster at the supermarket and suck the fluid out of the master cylinder.Using only fresh fluid from a sealed container-pick up a 32 oz. bottle of DOT 3 while you're out getting the baster-fill back up the reservoir. Now jack up the back of the vehicle and pull the wheels off.Put a drain pan under the right rear and open the bleeder.Let the fluid run out until it comes out like the new fluid-this can take a while so have patience and watch the level in the master so you don't run out.Once the right rear is coming out like new(close the bleeder) the other side rear won't take but a few minutes to do the same thing(and then close the bleeder).Put the wheels back on and move to the front and do the same thing-the front won't take as long-start with the right front.If the fluid won't start flowing on it's own in the back you can persuade it by gently pushing down on the brake pedal with the bleeder open until you see fluid coming out-then gently let the pedal back up-have patience and let it start flowing on it's after that and no air will remain in the brakes.Close the bleeder on the left front(your last wheel) and pump the pedal-your pedal should be hard and high at this point.With all new fluid in your system you will notice your brakes are working better and fade free.I do my own car and customer cars this way as preventative maintenance and a performance increaser .By all means feel free to ask any more questions you may still have and I'll try to answer them.


    Do you have to do have to bleed a different way with traction control? I know with stainless steel brake lines there are six brake lines. Does this creat a problem with bleeding?

  11. #11
    1SlowTA 00BlueTA's Avatar
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    should still be only one bleeder screw

    -00BlueTA

  12. #12
    Senior Member 02z28ls1's Avatar
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    OK-there is an intelligent question because you looked at the steel lines and where they went and you know what the ABS module is.If I remember correctly the Camaro went to the Bosch style ABS/traction control setup in 98 so those of you w/older models will have a different looking setup-but the bleeding tips are still true.I'll try to get to why that is later but for now let me give a simple answer to your question-no-it doesn't make any difference to the bleeding method as I described it.You will notice that 2 lines come off the master and go to the ABS/traction control module-then 4 lines come off of that and one goes to each wheel so that the ABS can control each wheel-the traction control can also brake a wheel along with other things.As long as you have no air (relatively speaking-there may actually be a little)in the system when you start flushing the fluid-you wont have to worry about air getting in when you gravity bleed.There are reasons for the way I describe doing it -but to get into the reasons for doing things like that would take a book-and really aren't something to worry about with a simple flush.To substitute different methods into the way I said-like having someone pump the pedal instead of gravity bleeding-does require more knowledge about the subject than alot of people suspect.In other words do so at your own peril-but I don't want to come off as talking down to people.I do expect a certain level of mechanical aptitude from people who would be on a forum like this-but I never assume experience-and it takes both to be a pro.But you gotta get experience from somewhere and changing your own oil and flushing fluids is one way to start-just pay attention to what you're doing.Quick answer to bleeding the ABS/traction control(an impressive system IMHO)-it requires an ABS scan tool to move the valves-for our purposes it's not something to worry about-so there will be a small amout of fluid left unchanged in the module.I purposely "excersize" my ABS in the snow or wet to cycle this fluid out of there-just flush your fluid on a regular basis and you'll be good to go.How often-once a year is good-some sports car freaks do this constantly- you can get dip strips to test for moisture if you want to check it first.And like I was saying-don't be afraid to ask questions,I'll try to answer in ways people can understand.

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