Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28

A GREAT product !

This is a discussion on A GREAT product ! within the Showcar and Detailing forums, part of the General Help category; Ok, a bucket is a bucket right? Yes, that's right, it doesn't matter what bucket you use, as long as ...

  1. #21
    Member {FzS}BlacKMagicK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    917

    BlacK
    2001 WS6

    Ok, a bucket is a bucket right?

    Yes, that's right, it doesn't matter what bucket you use, as long as it is very clean.
    There are however a few buckets out there with a few accessories though, if you have a nice flat, even double wide driveway, you might want to consider a bucket with a dolley. There are also buckets that come with threaded, sealing tops, in case you have a car show to go to and want to bring a bucket full of distilled water and your favorite suds to do up your car before the show, and these can even come with another top that is actually a seat, to sit on while your hoods up at the show, and your putting away a cold one.

    You can get these here:http://www.autogeek.net/car-wash-bucket.html

    Now, no matter what bucket you use, you should consider getting a grit guard, ideally two for each bucket, what they do is keep dirt down in the bottom of the bucket where it belongs.

    Get those here:http://www.autogeek.net/gg1010.html

    The Two Bucket Method

    The 2 bucket method is where you use two separate buckets to wash the car. How I do it, is I fill one with full strength shampoo to water ratio and the other with water only. You wash an area of your car having first soaked your mitt in the bucket with soap, then rinse it off in the bucket with just water, then resoak in the soap bucket. What this does, is keep most of the dirt in a separate bucket, away from your full strength soap, helping to keep from putting dirt back on the car.

    Now, I like to do the car in sections, I start with the top, if you have T-tops, your car is basically a big 'ole bubble on top, all glass. So, first thing I do is blast the car with a nice tight hard spray from the garden hose, to get off larger debris, you work your way from the top down, taking your time, this isn't a race. Your car is now pre-soaked. I do all the glass pointing the hose down at the glass to force the dirt down off the car, then the same with the body. If you can wash your car in the shade, so much the better, if not, try to wait for that just right overcast day without rain. If you got bucks, get yourself a car canopy. That's what I plan on getting, not because I got bucks, but because I'm OC when it comes to my car...LOL

    Now also, if you want a great, thick soapy sudsy covering on your car to loosen up the dirt, before you begin to lay a mitt into it, then strongly consider getting yourself one of these:
    http://www.autogeek.net/foam-gun.html you won't regret it. I was hesitant at first about getting it,
    thinking it might not foam enough, let me tell you, you'll be real happy, more suds than a foam gun at a car wash gives you.

    Now, you want to start washing the car, basically what I do is wash the car twice. The first time, any given area is done with light pressure on the mitt, until the car is done, the second pass, the buckets are emptied and reupped, then the pressure applied is much heavier.

    Now, doing the car in sections from the top down, I do the windows first, then rinse, then hood and and fenders, then rinse, then one side, then rinse, then other side then rinse, then nose and rinse, then rear and rinse, I do the bottom foot of the car separately. Then the rims, tires and wheel wells. Keep in mind, you do small sections, then rinse off your mitt, and resoak with soap.

    I use a B&D cordless rechargable leaf blower to dry it, but you can use any leaf blower, I first use a California Jelly blade to get the water off the glass.

    Now the car is ready to clay. After claying, I wash it again.


    Tune in tomorrow when I'll discuss polishing, sealing, glazing and waxing.

  2. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    84

    Black
    2002 Camaro ss

    Thumbs up

    {FzS}BlacKMagicK

    This is awsome. I feel like a kid in school, but a kid that wants to learn and I am enjoying this, unlike most kids in school. I know I have hard water, and those spots are our enemies. I was thinking of just buying a good powerfull leaf blower just for the sake of blowing the water off my car after washing. Now I have another solution and I do it often.
    I have my car running so she is warmed up, then right after washing I just take her down a long road right by my house up to about 140 or so and there it is, no water spots. (I NEVER run my car hard until the engine is completly warmed up ,) I know it is the easy way out, but it is fun also.
    Am looking forward to your next post.
    All the best.........


    jess

    __________________________________________________ ____________

    2002 ss - Black - A4 - 323 - SLP loudmouth 11 - SLP lid - SLP # 5846

  3. #23
    I lika da Chevy's LETHALxLS1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,329

    BLACK
    Z/28 LS1

    ^ I bought a foam gun like Blackmagick mentioned and I must say it works great! Its something you will have for years so its worth the investment. I wish I had a thread like this to go by when I first started out.

  4. #24
    Member {FzS}BlacKMagicK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    917

    BlacK
    2001 WS6

    Before I go on, I should mention, the deionizing "waterstick" I talked about earlier does not have high pressure, the larger one has more than the smaller one, but these come with their own sprayer built in,
    so you couldn't use your own.
    The sprayer on the end leaves much to be desired as well.
    Also, if you wanted filtered water for a pressure washer, these could not help you out.
    The only deionizing filter I've ever seen rated high enough to feed a pressure washer is this one;
    http://crspotless.com/index.php?cate...gory_id%3D3%26 it comes with a built in (TDS) Total Dissolved Solids monitor but as you can see, it's pricey.
    Costco has it cheaper than the manufacturer, at $419.00
    Each cartridge is 20" in length, that is a lot of filter area. They also sell the same unit without the wheeling stand, a wall mount unit for like fifty bucks less. I would only trust the high output model to feed a pressure washer, but if you just wanted to use your garden hose, you could probably get away with the medium output model.
    The replacement media isn't cheap as you can see, but considering how many clean gallons you get,
    it more than pays for itself if you use a self service car wash.
    DO NOT USE FULLY AUTOMATED CAR WASHES.
    All your polishing will be for naught, they will reintoduce swirls into your paint faster than anything else can.
    They last a very long time and if you have several vehicles, live in an area of hard water, are a detail buff,
    or just want the ultimate clean water for a spot free rinse, than these might be for you.

    Another thing I'd like to mention is though Menzerna's polishes are made for single action rotary polishers,
    I have had excellent results using them with a dual action polisher.

    Ok, we've washed and clayed, time to start polishing.
    Before we begin, tape off any areas, you don't want to polish, you don't want to get polish on your weatherstripping, tail lights, third brake light, basically anything you don't want to polish.

    First thing you want to do is connect your 5" backing plate to your PC7424.
    Once it's on there take a green foam pad and center it on the backing plate.
    The back of the pad, and the front of the backing plate are velcro lined, so it will stick right to it.
    Now you want to take your polish, in this case the Menzerna Final Polish II and apply some to your pad.

    How much? I have seen much debate and many questions regarding this topic.
    Let me say, I am in the camp of a little more is better than too little.
    I have in my day polished many types of metals...brass, aluminum, stainless steel and copper.
    It was one of my many jobs as a Govt. service contractor when I used to make the doors for electromagnetic radio frequency shielded rooms. The metals I had to polish all started out cast stock, with relatively no finish. So you started out with either 60 or 80 grit sandpaper going up in grit to 2000, then finished with varying buffing compound grades on a buffing machine. This will put a mirror finish on any metal, it is time consuming and requires patience, but it is a skill I'm glad I learned.
    One of the things you learn polishing metal is a feel for the whole process, and one of the things you wouldn't do is put too much compound on your buffing wheel, too little won't do you much good either.

    The same applies to polishing paint. I've seen a lot of suggestions for a nickel size amount for a 2'x2' area. This is about right, but I like to go a little bit above that, say a nickel and a dime. One thing you should do is apply an amount to your pad, then spread it out over the area you want to polish, you should be able to get a nice even coverage, that to me is ideal.

    Before you put any polish on your pad, you want to do two things, first spray two fine mist spritzes of distilled water on it. Use a good spray bottle never before used for anything else.
    Hold it about six inches from the pad.
    If you spray more than twice you'll get a watery mess with polish flying everywhere, less than two, it will dry up too fast. Two quick sprays, then apply your polish. The second thing you want to do is apply a piece of tape to the back of your backing plate, so you can make sure your pad is always spinning. Trust me, since there is no clutch mechanism to compensate for pressure, this is a step you do not want to forget as you will be thinking your polishing your paint, when in fact you have a highly vibrating pad with some polish on it, making an attempt at polishing your paint. Without the tape, it will very much APPEAR as if it's spinning in a circle, this can be an illusion, make sure it is...stick a piece of tape, mark it with a marker, anything so that you can tell it is spinning.

    MAKE SURE IT'S ALWAYS SPINNING IN A CIRCLE.

    Now, you always want to turn on the machine while the pad is in contact with the car. Why?
    If you don't you and everything around you will be wearing the polish.
    Start off the machine on speed level one or two and make your way in a tight S shape through the area you want to polish. I shouldn't have to say it, but a nice even pressure, watch your tape indicator, make sure that backing plate and pad is turning. Make one to two passes like this.
    You want to overlap your passes say by about an inch, no more, you want to keep things even.
    I like to go right up to five after that and that is the speed you want to spend most of your time at.
    You will start to know when your polish is about to flash, when I know it is about to flash, I crank it up to six for a final one to two passes until it flashes.

    Now, another thing you will have to develop a feel for is when your polish will flash. In a way it's equivalent to how much time you got. You see, as your polishing, those abrasives are getting smaller and smaller, until they become ineffective, the medium they are suspended in is getting used up as well. There will come a point when you will see and then know, the polish is done. If you were to continue polishing anyway, you would then be doing what's known as dry buffing, and you don't want to do that. Then your just using the pad to polish with and dried up used polish and it will result in hazing and marring.

    After doing an area, your dying to view it, take your microfiber cloth and rub gently the area you've just done, if you really want to see the area well, spray a 50/50 solution of distilled water and rubbing alcohol sparingly, then rub it with your microfiber cloth. What you see will inspire you to keep on going.

    Now, if your lucky enough to have a garage, which is the ideal place to polish, your going to want to have an ideal form of lighting. Most people use Halogen lamps, usually two 500 watt heads.
    But I do not care for them, the light is yellowish, they use a lot of juice, and they throw off a lot of heat. Something I don't need in a garage in Florida.
    So here is the unit I have; http://www.naturallighting.com/web/s...on=show_detail
    In my comparisons, it shows up swirls and imperfections much better than a halogen

    I want to remind you, this tool is idiot proof, you will not mess up your car, following these instructions, anything that happens as a result of using this machine, can be taken care of easily. By that I mean, say you decided to go too aggressive at first and used too rough a pad and too aggressive a polish, there's a good chance you would end up with micromarring and hazing, even this can be fixed by stepping down the pad texture and polish to the next finest. But the thing is, you have to keep in mind, you are removing micro amounts of clear coat from your paint. If there is no need for an aggressive pad an polish combo...then there is no need period.

    Also, go here;http://www.autogeek.net/ccs-polishing-how-to.html and scroll down to around the bottom of the page and watch all the videos for the PC7424, this will give you a nice idea of how to use it.


    I also want to say here that this tool is NOT a single action rotary, and someone proficient with a rotary would be able to yield superior results to a dual action polisher. But, it is safe, very safe. The chances of burning your paint, especially near edges with a rotary is just more than you want to take. If later on down the road when you feel you are master of the dual action polisher and go around polishing everything including your grandmother's teeth, well then you might want to start taking a look at getting a rotary. But, as many suggest, don't jump into it using it on YOUR car. Go to a junkyard, say hey, can I have some scrap pieces and practice away on those first. Intently actually burn a few pieces so you get a feel for how it happens. Only then should you consider doing your own car.


    Now, once you have finished doing the car with Menzerna's FPII, you simply begin to use the white pad and start using Menzerna's Micro Polish to jewel it to perfection. Polishing takes time, realistically you should put aside two full days, for just the polishing alone. For one thing so you don't start feeling pressured and begin to rush, this is something you have to have patience for. If your not that kind of person, consider having your car professionally detailed.
    Secondly, you want to use part of the second day to wash the car after your done polishing and apply a nice coat of Wolfgang sealant.

    Now once your up to that point, make sure you have some application pads, apply a nice coat of Wolfgang Sealant, now I let mine sit for 24hours without buffing it out, then I buffed it out with several deluxe microfiber cloths. Came off pretty easy. Then I applied Klasse glaze, that I buffed out after it dried again with MF cloths. Let another 24 hours go by, and then topped with two coats of Pinnacle's Souverän Paste Wax, with about 12 hours in between.

    If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask.
    Last edited by {FzS}BlacKMagicK; 09-30-2007 at 02:20 AM.

  5. #25
    I lika da Chevy's LETHALxLS1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,329

    BLACK
    Z/28 LS1

    ^ VERY good information in all of your posts in this thread. Should make a sticky out of it.

  6. #26
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    84

    Black
    2002 Camaro ss

    For what its worth, I agree about the sticky.
    This kind of in depth info you just can't glance at + then remember.
    Point by point steps ..............



    jess

    __________________________________________________ __________

    2002 ss - Black - A4 - 323 - SLP loudmouth 11 - SLP lid - SLP # 5846

  7. #27
    Detailing + Design third_shift|studios's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Age
    36
    Posts
    21,719

    My life is a
    Ben Stiller movie.

    Quote Originally Posted by jess View Post
    Hey djvaly
    Thanks for the info. I was beside myself wondering what to do for my problem, until I found the Klitz. I will definately take your advice in the future, as no one wants to spend money when a simple household item will do the job. Have you ever used baking soda and water on your car ?
    By the way I have to ask, how do you like that 402 ls2 in your TA ?
    All the best.

    LMFAO OMG

  8. #28
    I lika da Chevy's LETHALxLS1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,329

    BLACK
    Z/28 LS1

    ^ LOL u so crazy!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. New 3M Product
    By 617wingnut in forum Showcar and Detailing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-25-2013, 11:07 AM
  2. 1956 Chevrolet Corvette - C6.R's Great-Great-Great
    By Ed Blown Vert in forum Corvette
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-04-2009, 11:06 AM
  3. How to product...
    By predator in forum Almost Anything Goes
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-03-2008, 12:07 PM
  4. New Product
    By Wesman in forum General Help
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-06-2006, 02:42 PM
  5. New product @ HSW
    By Matt@HSW in forum Nitrous
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-06-2006, 04:02 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •