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Melting headlight plug..

This is a discussion on Melting headlight plug.. within the Stereo and Electronics forums, part of the General Help category; So, a few months ago my driver's side headlight went out. Figured it just burned out, went and bought a ...

  1. #1
    Desert Boat Guy SouthernBornThriller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Charlotte, NC

    Black 2002 T/A M6
    Green 1997 Ram 4x4

    Melting headlight plug..

    So, a few months ago my driver's side headlight went out. Figured it just burned out, went and bought a new light, popped the hood, and noticed something very strange. The plug that connects to the back of the light itself was just a melted wad of plastic (and very warm to the touch). Changed the light anyway, ordered a new plug, snipped the old one off and spliced the new one on, and everything was fine.

    Now I had to dive in the other day because the wires had come apart where I spliced the new plug in (damn you pop-up headlights!) and I noticed that the new plug looks slightly melted.

    Only had this issue on the driver's side, and only the low beam light...high beam and passenger side plugs still look new. Any ideas?

    Also, any recommendations from wiring guru's on getting the wires to stay together better? First thought was butt connectors. Those lasted about 2 weeks. Next idea was splice + fuckton of electrical tape. Worked for awhile, but the wires still tend to come apart fairly often between bumpy roads, turn headlights on and off, cleaning the engine bay, etc. Taking my headlight assembly apart damn near every weekend is getting old.

  2. #2
    None Shall Pass Knight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    East of Cleveland, Ohio

    99 WS.6 - Modified

    Are you using the stock listed bulbs, or have you upgraded to a higher wattage bulb? Usually a melted plug can be traced to 1.) a bad connection between the plug and terminal, causing the electricity to jump/arc - thereby heating up the plug. 2.) Using a higher wattage componant, causing a higher amp draw than the plug is rated for, thereby melting it, or the componant reaches a higher temp. than the plug was designed to withstand. 3.) A short or ground.

    As for the splicing, soldering the wiring would be the best solution to your problem.

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