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Wet or Dry?

This is a discussion on Wet or Dry? within the Nitrous forums, part of the LSx Technical Help Section category; I'm a newbie when it comes to anything N2O related, I know there are a million of these threads but ...

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    Member 00 formula's Avatar
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    Wet or Dry?

    I'm a newbie when it comes to anything N2O related, I know there are a million of these threads but I haven't found one to answer my questions yet... I have a mostly stock (exhaust and lid mods only) 2000 Formy with a 15x,xxx miles, it's an A4 and both tranny and engine still run very strong, rear end rebuilt 50,000 miles ago but is still stock.

    I'd like to run something safe even pre-tune (that will come eventually) and am thinking of running 75 to 100 shot (preferably 100).

    What I'd like to know is will a 100 shot be safe on my car? What else would I need to get to support a 75 or a 100 shot? What is the difference in performance/ safety and whatever else between a wet or a dry kit?

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    Senior Member mrr23's Avatar
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    i own a 2000 formula as well. i went straight to a 150+ wet shot, back when i was completely stock right to the paper filter. went 11.97 @ 117 with a 11.99 the next round. i'd say you'll be fine. the only concern i have is the 150K+ miles on the trans.

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    Member 00 formula's Avatar
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    Yea that is a bit concerning but considering I'm going with a lower shot (like I said between 75 and a 100) and not too often hopefully it'll be ok for a little longer. I'll probably end up getting it rebuilt soon anyways.

    Is there any benefit to running wet?

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    Give the thread below a look. There is quite a bit of useful information in it.

    http://www.ls1tech.com/forums/showth...ght=vs+dry+wet

    Arguments can go on for days with wet vs. dry. Is one better than the other, not in my opinion, but they both have their ups and downs. And neither is more safe than the other. When used correctly and with important safety devices they will both perform flawlessly.
    Benefits of a Dry system:
    1) Even fuel distribution - the fuel is added via the injector which means each cylinder will have equal parts of fuel. Down side is that depending on modifications, an upsizing in injector size might be required.
    2) Bottle pressure reliance - Bottle pressure is not a large factor with a dry shot. Fuel is added based on the amount of airflow seen by the MAF, therefore you will get a consistent a/f everytime. The downside to the MAF registering the added airflow is that you must position the nozzle in such a manner that the MAF picks up all of the added nitrous. Some time can be spent trying to position the nozzle in the exact position to get a safe a/f reading.
    Benefits of a wet system.
    1) Torque - You generally have a larger torque spike with a wet system over a dry. Downside is, will this added low end torque be beneficial...or will it hurt you off the line?
    2) Fuel system reliance - On a wet system, you pull the fuel off of the factory system and is added via a fuel jet. This makes tuning your a/f easy by simply changing the fuel jet. Also, if you were ever to exceed your factory fuel system, you can add a stand alone system. The downside to this is that you're now reliant on bottle pressure to maintain the proper a/f ratio. Too low pressure and you'll run rich, too high and you'll go lean.

    These are just a few of the many plus' and minus' to wet vs. dry. And like I said earlier, neither is better than the other. I also didn't include any cons such as component failure, ie. fuel solenoid, because with routine maintance and general upkeep, you'll never have to worry about any failures.

    I personally recommend our dry plate kit with 'Interface' controller. Its easy to install and makes for a very clean looking setup. It will easily reach your goals of 75-100 and exceed them if you ever need to. If you have any questions please feel free to shoot me a PM. Thanks.

    Matt

  5. #5
    cutting and welding mark21742's Avatar
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    thanks for answering alot of my questions too Matt!

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    Member 00 formula's Avatar
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    Thanks Matt, I really appreciate the info.

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    Junior Member leonardTA1999's Avatar
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    I Wouldn`t Plan On Going More Than 100 On A Dry Set Up Unless You Have A Killer Tune As Far As Injectors,plugs, Fuel Pump Go Wet And Theres No Need To Change Your Factory Settings.. I`ve Been Playing With The N/x Sharkbite Nozzle And .51 On Nitrous And .33 On Fuel 900 Psi 10lb Bottle Roughly 175 Shot Wet And The Car Responds Well All Stock Full Factory Weight And 6 Speed 4:10`s Slicks And Me Driving 11:90`s @ 117

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